“Quo Vadis Europe?”

CAMPAIGN with activities on EU matters

1. „QUO VADIS, HUMAN?“ (Where is this world going?)
an international electronic artistic competition for students (14-20 years old)
Organised by Regional youth centre Košice, Slovakia
www.rcm.sk

The motto of the competition:
“Now that we have learned to fly the air like birds, swim under water like fish, we lack one thing—to learn to live on earth as human beings.” (George Bernard Shaw)

We live in an amazing twenty-first century. Life has never been so easy as today. We have a roof over our heads, enough to eat, our drinking water flows directly from the tap, deadly epidemics do not threaten us, the world in which we live is relatively safe. We have access to information, education, we have freedom. We have things that make our lives easier that our parents could never have imagined… So we have everything we need for a satisfied and happy life. But … Are we really happy? What do we still lack?
This year’s competition “Quo vadis, human?” bears the subtitle “Where is this world going?” and aims to encourage young people to respond to current events in human society by artistic means. Within the competition you can tackle any current issues that resonate in the human society, whether at local, regional or global level. Your fantasy …
Since this is an international competition, we assume that the interpretation of this theme will vary, bring different points of view, which of course is our intention. Thanks to it we can see perception of reality of young people from different cultures which brings international dialogue on the artistic level.

Contest categories:
I. Two-dimensional work of art (all art technology + computer graphics)
II. Multimedia works (powerpoint slideshows, videos, music …)
Internet voting – price for work most voted for

More information, winning pictures:
http://rcm.sk/blog/2016/12/05/quo-vadis-clovek-kam-kraca-tento-svet/
4

5

21

26


2. BUILDING BRIDGES FOR REFUGEE KIDS

System & Generation, Ankara Turkey
Since the Syrian crisis started in 2011, Turkey has hosted over two million Syrian refugees, as well as additional asylum seekers from Afghanistan, Iraq, Somalia and Iran. This number is expected to rise, especially among Syrian families. Half of the refugees coming from Syria are children, however, according to the Human Rights Watch, more than 400,000 Syrian refugee children living
in Turkey are not attending school.
The Turkish government adopted a policy in September of 2014 that formally grants Syrian children access to Turkish public schools, but key obstacles, including the language barrier, social integration issues, economic hardship, and lack of information about the policy continue to be a problem. Because of this, our main goal is the inclusion into society of these children and
their families, by voluntarily teaching them Turkish as well as English. Additionally we will concentrate on providing the needed support regarding clothes, medicines and other donations
for the refugee families who are living in the Keçiören district of Ankara. The Turkish government adopted a policy in September of 2014 that formally grants Syrian children access to Turkish public schools, but key obstacles, including the language barrier, social integration issues, economic hardship, and lack of information about the policy continue to be a problem. Because of this, our main goal is the inclusion into society of these children and their families, by voluntarily teaching
them Turkish as well as English.
Our volunteers from System and Generation Association are joining the project activities very actively. Every Friday and Saturday they help the refugee kids learn new things, they play games and made handcrafts with them.
Additionally we will concentrate on providing the needed support regarding clothes, medicines and other donations for the refugee families who are living in the Keçiören district of Ankara.

turkey    turkey1 turkey2    turkey3

 

3. SEMINAR “Ohne Angst verschieden sein können” in Würzburg, Germany

The Jugendbildungsstätte Unterfranken organized a three days Seminar
“Ohne Angst verschieden sein können” (a quote from Adorno: to be able to be different without fear) from 9th till 11th of November 2016. On the first evening we started the seminar to commemorate the Cristal Night. We have listened to the rap song ‘Kristallnacht’ bei Samy Deluxe and the to preach poetry text of one of our pedagogues (Oliver Berger) about the Cristal Night.
There was a special guest, Batsheva Dagan: Polish-Israeli Shoah survivor, educator, author,
children psychologist, who writes books about Shoah addressed to children and teenagers.
We showed an animation film ‘Chika the dog in the ghetto’ which is based on one of her books.
After the film we had a discussion with the guest, Batsheva Dagan, she was telling about
her story but also about her books.
Links in German:
http://www.mainpost.de/ueberregional/kulturwelt/kultur/Happy-End-einer-Holocaust-UEberlebenden;art3809,9411373,B::pic16691,7422514
http://www.mainpost.de/ueberregional/kulturwelt/kultur/Happy-End-einer-Holocaust-UEberlebenden;art3809,9411373,B::pic16691,7422513

Scene from the movie „Chika, die Hündin im Ghetto“. Foto: Trikk17, dpa

Batsheva Dagan Foto: Ivana Biscan

 

4. Human Rights Education, 26-29.11.2016
Youth Centre Villa Elba, Finland.

Human Rights Education for Finnish Youth Centres and their pedagogical staff was organized
with the support of the Ministry of Education and Culture of Finland.
It was led by the Council of Europe trainers Roosa Puhakainen-Mattila and Ida Kreutzman.
The aim of the training was to raise knowledge and skills in relation to Human Rights education, in the pedagogical programs, in Finnish Youth Centres.

The training included the following:
– What are the Human Rights and what is Human Right Education?
– How to practice Human Rights Education in Youth Work?
– Peer learning- learning from good practices?
– Human Rights Education in Finnish Youth Centres?
– World School?

We had many interesting discussions, found new tools and made new plans to develop in our work.
We had interesting and extremely good training.
We also got information of Coe campaigns, especially ‘No Hate’ campaign.

Ritva Saarikettu
Youth Centre Villa Elba/ Finnish Youth Centre Association
International coordinator

  

 

5. International Day Against Fascism (9th November) &
Human Rights Day (10th December)

Organised by Filoxenia in cooperation with local schools, Korinthia, Greece
Background:
On 9 November, we remember the terrible crimes committed by European fascists in
the 1930s and 40s. Across Europe, millions of people were murdered simply for
their religion, ethnicity, sexual orientation, perceived disabilities or political views.
But even in those terrible times, there were people who resisted against fascism, even at great personal cost. Today, we are also living through uncertain and fearful times.
Meanwhile, discrimination and prejudice against other minorities is also increasing in many parts of Europe. But still, many people choose to stand up and show their opposition to such views.

We must reaffirm our common humanity. Wherever we are, we can make a real difference. In the street, in school, at work, in public transport; in the voting booth, on social media.
The time for this is now. “We the peoples” can take a stand for rights. And together, we can take a stand for more humanity. It starts with each of us.

Our goal is to raise awareness against racism, fascism, discrimination among young people at schools and learning them to value diversity in their life.
As every year, we invite schools to get involved with the campaign and we proposed some activities and workshops.

– Graffiti workshop with students at Gymnasium in Kryoneri

 

 

– Kids art workshop

 

6. Young refugees in Greece ⁣

Filoxenia organised a social solidarity action in cooperation with the Elementary school and the Gymnasium of Kryoneri-Korinthia, to collect food utensils from the pupils’ families for young refugees and handed them over to the Doctors of the World Polyclinic in Athens.

Filoxenia’s Board of Directors member Alexandros Souvatzis cooperates during the last years as a volunteer with the Doctors of the World – Greece (http://mdmgreece.gr/en/), by supporting refugees’ Hot-Spots in Greece.

Alexandros has been involved, not just as a medical professional (physiotherapist) in the primary medical care of refugees in Athens and in the Hot-Spots in Greece as well.
His experience in youth work has been also very useful in supporting young refugees.

Those youngsters aged between 15 and 20 have escaped to Greece (and the European Union) mainly from Syria and Afghanistan, alone, without families. They have to stay in the Greek Hot-Spots between 6 and 18 months, until all necessary formalities and measures have been taken, to be allowed to travel to their relatives in some other European countries, Canada, USA or Australia.
During their stay in Greece they need also personal help, to organize legal papers and get social support, proper clothing and school lessons.
The youngsters are attending school classes, according to their Greek language knowledge. In Greece there are a few intercultural secondary schools, such as the Intercultural public school at Elliniko district in Athens, which is organising special exams after a 6 months school visit, to place the young refugees to a proper school classes, according to their language abilities. These are the only schools in Greece, authorized to use this procedure.

Alexandros cooperates the last years with the “Polyiatreion” (Polyclinic) of the Doctors of the World in the centre of Athens, offering his medical help and accompanying some youngsters to authorities and social services.
Additionally he was involved in summer camps for young refugees in cooperation with the Greek Boyscout Federation, and in some other social activities in the Hot-Spots, such as Santa Claus visits during Christmas 2016.