Better Places for young people

The members of ENYC offer a rich source of expertise and resources for young people.  We intend to bring our knowledge together and to develop a strategy to support good practice in our respective countries and also as a source of advice to the Council of Europe in its development of centres.  The strategy is outlined below:

WATCH THIS SPACE – AND BE PREPARED TO FILL IN THE QUESTIONNAIRE THAT YOU RECEIVE FROM TOM WYLIE, PRESIDENT OF ENYC

PLACES FOR YOUNG PEOPLE

“Place” is a key element in creating effective strategies to secure the support and development of young people in their transition to adulthood.

There are two essential domains:

1. Young people having access to and feeling welcome in the public realm. Young people are citizens now and should be enabled to move freely across the world
 

2. Special places designed for young people to use. This briefing note covers the second element
 
Special places for young people
 
These range from a shelter where young people can gather out of the rain to large multi-purpose facilities offering a huge range of opportunities, including, in some circumstances, residential provision. High quality, safe, well appointed places provide havens for the young, particularly in areas where the streets are simply not a safe place to be.

“Place”, however, is more than four walls and a roof. It can offer:

      an environment for learning, new skills, about themselves and others; creativity; decision making and self-determination
    *a range of opportunities and activities from social media to climbing walls
    * access to support, guidance and development from skilled adults and peer mentors
    * fun with friends and across communities and generations
    * a chance to share experiences and understandings across communities and countries and to develop a shared vision for the world

The Strategy

ENYC is a multi-national organisation which understands places and young people. The members of ENYC provide services through a wide range of organisational forms. Through analysis of current practice, it is possible to develop a theory of place which informs good practice across a network of countries. The strategy can be in 3 stages:
 

   1. Identify from members the key characteristics of existing provision and analyse those factors which determine the best fit to local circumstances, resulting in better outcomes for young people

   1. Undertake a seminar to validate the findings and to extract critical success factors for a strategy of place. See Appendix 1

   1. Support members within their own countries to take forward work on place and advise the Council of Europe of the implications for its Centres and facilities
      Appendix 1

PLACES FOR YOUNG PEOPLE
 
An opportunity for countries for Europe to validate the report findings on securing non-formal places for young people to meet and to learn. This will also include residential work with young people where relevant.

The seminar will consider:
 

    *  the governance of provision
    * the funding of provision
    * workforce
    * curriculum
    * usage by young people
    * involvement of young people in decision making
    * managing and quality
    * quality assurance and measuring impact

Through the process of the seminar participants will develop an understanding on the critical success factors to secure effective places for young people.
 
A report of the seminar will be made available to participants and posted on www.eycn.org. The report will be submitted to the Council of Europe for their consideration.